Last week the WaterCooler clued you in on what to expect at MIP 2015, and now we’ll tell you what to expect from VideoAge’s MIP/April issue, which is a must-read during some downtime in Cannes or, more likely, on the flight home.

COVER STORIES:

“New U.S. Pilots For the New TV Season Are Being Shaped By Films, Authors Bios, Medical Doctors and Juris Doctors”
VideoAge
rounds up the shows that are in the running to become new series for 2015-2016, and find some trends (including shows based on movies and diverse casts).

“The Future of Broadcast: Will Live Events, New Ratings Make FTA Alive Again?”
U.S. media strategist and former Universal Studio and Microsoft executive Blair Westlake explains the current challenges of – and opportunities for — free-to-air television.

“The Magic’ International Buyers Have to Perform in Order to Stretch Their Program Acquisition Budgets”
Buyers’ “tricks” include asking for longer license periods, multiple rights and/or getting sponsored content for free.

HALL OF FAME KICK-OFF:

At MIP-TV 2015, VideoAge is starting a new feature: The International TV Distribution “Hall of Fame.” The first edition honors Alan Silverbach, Fox Studio’s first international TV sales executive.

MARKET PREVIEWS AND REVIEWS:

VideoAge offers it usual a straight-from-the-floor roundup of DISCOP Istanbul, which ended February 25, and saw a growth in participants from the Middle East, Romania and Korea, and some controversy.

VideoAge tells you what’s new at MIP-TV this year (including a special focus on the Nordics and more extracurriculars than ever), and buyers’ and sellers’ prospective alike.

As always, VideoAge’s Event Planner lists all the pertinent upcoming TV industry events.

COMPANY PROFILE:

In this issue, we take you behind the scenes at Belgium’s Studio 100 and explore the growth of their international sales offices in Germany.

AND MORE:

As always, we also have world news items (from Ireland, Germany, the U.K., Singapore, the U.S. and Italy); a book review (in which we learn the history of the @ sign) and Dom Serafini’s “My 2 Cents,” which this month is about the rather hard-to-decipher new language of television.